r/Damnthatsinteresting Aug 17 '22 Silver 8 Wholesome 7 Helpful 6 To The Stars 1 Ally 1 All-Seeing Upvote 1

In 1988 the U.S. government wanted to see how strong reinforced concrete was, so they performed the "Rocket-sled test" launching an F4 Phantom aircraft at 500mph into a slab of it. The result? An atomized plane and a standing concrete slab Video

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71.9k Upvotes

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u/StressTree Aug 17 '22

The original mythbusters

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

[deleted]

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u/Worthless_Clockwork Aug 17 '22 Silver

What is it with bearded somewhat bald men doing odd things and Albuquerque?

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u/captainAwesomePants Aug 17 '22 Gold

They like it because the sun is always shining and the air smells like warm root beer and the towels are oh so fluffy.

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u/Slanted_Jack Aug 17 '22

And you could stay at the world famous Albuquerque Holiday Inn.

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

Hey! You can't have that! That snorkel's been just like a snorkel to me!

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u/Kahmael Aug 17 '22

And I'm like give it, and he's like make me, and I'm like, K. So I took a big bite out of his jugular vein!

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u/oblivion007 Aug 17 '22

Yes indeed you better believe it

And somehow in the middle of it all, the phone got knocked off the hook

And twenty seconds later I heard a familiar voice

And you know what it said?

I'll tell you what it said!

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u/marablackwolf Aug 17 '22

If you'd like to make a call, please hang up and try again. If you need help hang up and then dial your operator... in Albuquerque!

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u/BobRoberts01 Aug 17 '22

Aa-A-Aa-AL BUQUERQUE !

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u/TheBeatGoesAnanas Aug 17 '22

All I've got, is this box of one dozen starving, crazed weasels.

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u/Gone420 Aug 17 '22

Alright I’ll take it

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u/dpitch40 Aug 17 '22

Say, that reminds me of another amusing anecdote...

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u/MintasaurusFresh Aug 17 '22

And you can drink soup right out of the ash trays if you wanna. It's okay, they're clean!

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u/allaboutketchup Aug 17 '22

I. HATE. SAUERKRAUT.

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u/Tie_Jay Aug 17 '22

That's all I'm really tryin' to say

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u/DrakonIL Aug 17 '22

Lived in Albuquerque for a few years, the air actually does sometimes have a mild warm root beer smell. No idea why, could just be association with the song.

13

u/HOUbikebikebike Aug 17 '22

Where the Shriners and the lepers play their ukuleles all day long

And anybody on the street will gladly shave yo' back for a NICKEL

Wakka-wakka-doo-doo, yeah!

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u/Syzygy_Stardust Aug 17 '22

Wacka wacka doodoo, yeah!

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u/Portlander_in_Texas Aug 17 '22

I'm gonna go with the theory that turquoise jewelry and atomized ground clutter from the nuke tests causes the brain to heavily lean towards zany experimentation.

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u/stefan0202 Aug 17 '22

Atomized ground clutter? Dammit Mary, they're minerals!

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u/idoitoutdoors Aug 17 '22

Every few months the windows in my office at the Mineral Science and Engineering Complex (MSEC) would rattle a little bit because they set off a massive explosion out there.

P.S. The school name is most commonly abbreviated to New Mexico Tech (NMT).

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u/tallwhiteninja Aug 17 '22

Went to Tech in the late 00's (comp sci major). Part of the tech experience is hearing a loud explosion just on the other side of the mountain and absolutely no one reacting because we're all used to it, lol.

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u/MihalysRevenge Aug 17 '22

https://www.sandia.gov/news/videos/legacy-footage/

The purpose of the test was to determine the impact force, versus time, due to the impact, of a complete F-4 Phantom — including both engines — onto a massive, essentially rigid reinforced concrete target (3.66 meters thick). Previous tests used F-4 engines at similar speeds. The test was not intended to demonstrate the performance (survivability) of any particular type of concrete structure to aircraft impact. The impact occurred at the nominal velocity of 215 meters per second (about 480 mph). The mass of the jet fuel was simulated by water; the effects of fire following such a collision was not a part of the test. The test established that the major impact force was from the engines. The test was performed by Sandia National Laboratories under terms of a contract with the Muto Institute of Structural Mechanics, Inc., of Tokyo.

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u/poodlebutt76 Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

My all time favorite myth busters moment when they crashed the car with a rocket sled like this:

Jamie: our objective was to fuse metal and pancake the car. Did we achieve that? ... What car?

https://youtu.be/aSVfYwdGSsQ?t=2m37s

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u/Adjective_Noun_69420 Aug 17 '22

Holy shit! Forget the car, did they also break that big fucking concrete wall? Is that the same wall from the F4 crash test?

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u/Lucian41 Aug 17 '22

That seems like a normal concrete wall, not the reinforced kind from the F4 test

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u/IngloriousMustards Aug 17 '22

Nuh-huh. I want at least 5% raise if you want me to pilot that thing.

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

The jet was traveling so fast upon impact; it shattered into millions of tiny pieces. The only section which remained intact was the small section of the wing which missed the target entirely. While the video is mesmerizing in its magnificent deconstruction, the resulting damage to the concrete block is surprisingly minuscule.

i ain't gonna pilot it

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u/mrsrosieparker Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

The plane-shaped stain on the concrete at the end of the video reminded me of r/looneytuneslogic

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u/Deter86 Aug 17 '22

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u/Tobu91 Aug 17 '22

oh wow, that didn't go as planned

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u/Weird-Vagina-Beard Aug 17 '22 Silver Helpful

But it did go as planed.

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u/mournfulgestalt Aug 17 '22

You...take your well-earned karma and get the hell out of here!

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u/My_Socks_Are_Blue Aug 17 '22

Tell that to the man that designed the hull of the ship

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u/wonkey_monkey Expert Aug 17 '22

The plane-shaped stain

makes me think of that refrain

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u/bullseye2112 Aug 17 '22

I didn’t see a shot of the concrete at the end of the video

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u/Boromir82 Aug 17 '22

Best I can do is 100 dollars every minute for the rest of your life.

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u/dimension_42 Aug 17 '22

This reminds me of the story about the Gurkhas in WWII. The British wanted them to drop in behind enemy lines to help stop the Japanese. The British Major they were with told the Gurkha sergeant that they were going to drop them from 600 feet. The sergeant talked to his men and came back and asked if it could be lower. The Brit said "Okay, we can do 500 feet." The Gurkha went to speak with his men, came back and said "They say it's still too high, they want it to be lower." The Major said "Well, we could drop you from 400 feet but that won't leave enough time for the parachutes to open." The Gurkha replied "Oh! Parachutes? We can drop from 600 feet then."

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

This thing got Buckaroo Bonsai'ed to the fifth dimension.

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u/itrustyouguys Aug 17 '22

Sometimes the military really misses on an opportunity. Just once I'd like to see them do something like this, but put a bunch of evenly spaced out 3 inch holes. That way when the projectile slams into the wall, it comes out the other side in crazy ass strings. You know, like a giant play dough squeeze tool strainer.

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u/jardedCollinsky Aug 17 '22

For science, obviously

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u/Spectre211286 Aug 17 '22

“The difference between screwing around and science is writing it down.”

― Adam Savage

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u/basics Aug 17 '22

Well science also needs to be repeatable.

So we should do it at least three times.

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u/caporaltito Aug 17 '22

And then publish a paper named like "Crazy ass strings generation using a high density dummy object in a high kinetic impact"

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u/mateogg Aug 17 '22

They should have put two slits in the wall to check if the plane interfered with itself.

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u/forever_a-hole Aug 17 '22 Helpful Bravo!

Quantum enplaneglement

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u/SheenTStars Aug 17 '22

Sciency wordy

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u/Genetic_Fox Aug 17 '22

“Spaghettified” - Event Horizon 1997

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 23 '22

[deleted]

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u/sylver_dragon Aug 17 '22

It is an F-4 Phantom II. The whole design of the aircraft is predicated on "if you add enough thrust, even a brick will fly". This clearly had the thrust; so, they needed to avoid flying as designed.

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u/funktopus Aug 17 '22

I love older military equipment for shit like this. Like the A-10, hey we have this awesome gun, I know lets make it fly!

I swear half of the older stuff was done on a dare for some of it.

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u/alexanderyou Aug 17 '22

The fat electrician on youtube has some hilarious videos on a bunch of old military stuff like this. "They left the grunts in charge, who decided to flood one side of the battleship to tilt it 15 degrees so the main guns could shoot further inland. It fucking worked"

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u/shit_poster9000 Aug 17 '22

“They gangster leaned a battleship!”

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u/funktopus Aug 17 '22

That sounds like my buddies dad growing up. "Hey if we remove this part we can fire and extra 300 feet!" Or the top will blow off, won't know until you try!

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u/FarseerTaelen Aug 17 '22

USS Texas on D-Day, right?

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u/Tastytyrone24 Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

The only ship to actually hit its targets that day

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u/-TheDyingMeme6- Aug 17 '22

By floodig one of its torpedo ports

Literally embodies its name lmao

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u/TakenUrMom Aug 17 '22

Wait is that really how the a10 became a thing?

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u/XxRUDYTUDYxX Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

The main reason was to build the US's first and only close air support aircraft. They needed maneuverability, survivability, and a big fucking gun.

Government saw the 20mm vulcans, said "make it bigger and make it fly". The entire aircraft is built around the weapon lol.

edit: inaccuracies, and yes, it was the only production CAS aircraft. Other US CAS aircraft are multirole.

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u/UDSJ9000 Aug 17 '22

GE was told they need a gun that can kill cold war era tanks with a lucky hit, and APCs or lighter guaranteed. Thus they made the GAU-8. Then the US realized they wanted this as an air platform weapon, so they designed an airframe around the weapon to get it in the air.

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u/Cory123125 Aug 17 '22

IIRC if you could magically acquire enough ammunition to keep it going, the gun would have enough force to fly the plane, no jets needed.

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u/UnholyHunger Aug 17 '22

Stop giving the military ideas! Just what we need, Bullet propelled jets and cars to use up old ammo to save on fuel.

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u/friedmators Aug 17 '22

Modern fighters are basically this. Tip of the sword radar system with a plane bolted to it.

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

And this is why we don't fear terror attacks on nuclear power plants.

Nothing short of bunker busters, prolonged heavy artillery fire or actual nukes will dent the dome.

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u/jarbar82 Aug 17 '22

What about 1 disgruntled employee? I don't know how they work, I'm actually curious if 1 person could cause a significant amount of damage.

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u/bit-groin Aug 17 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote hehehehe Masterpiece Facepalm

You'd have to throw that employe really really fast to have a significant impact... We are talking close to light speed fast...

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

I do believe that most NPPs have firm rules against launching employees at relativistic speeds. Generally it is quite frowned upon.

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u/hogtiedcantalope Aug 17 '22

OSHA limits maximum velocity to 0.09c

Thanks Obama

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

That's just an unreasonable infringement on my personal liberty, as well as artificially capping worker productivity.

You think China has limits on worker velocity?

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

That is a true patriot! He will literally take on the laws of physics for the betterment of his constituents.

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u/EitherEconomics5034 Aug 17 '22

If they are Laws, they can be repealed. Physics be damned.

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

The legalese will be difficult and the bureaucracy (deep state) will fight it every step of the way.

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u/Xaqv Aug 17 '22

No offense to his integrity as a jurist, but wasn’t he at one time a circus human cannonball performer

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

Obamadontcare

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u/jackie4chan27 Aug 17 '22

I know right! Can't masturbate on planes after 9/11 either! Thanks Bin Laden.

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/_ConfusedAlgorithm Aug 17 '22

Their lungs are not sufficient though.

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u/Toonfish_ Aug 17 '22

[...] at relativistic speeds. Generally Specially it is quite frowned upon.

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

Heh, I see what you did there +1

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u/goodgirlathena Aug 17 '22

OSHA would not be pleased.

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

Word such as disgruntled and aggrieved might even be used

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u/SuppleFoxFluff Aug 17 '22

No wonder he's disgruntled

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u/compellinglymediocre Aug 17 '22

i audibly laughed at this while i’m supposed to be studying fuck you

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u/psycho_driver Aug 17 '22

i’m supposed to be studying fuck you

Maybe you should be studying to fuck in general, not just the one individual?

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u/runnerhasnolife Aug 17 '22

Actually to get the speed you would need the body would disintegrate and cause a massive explosion from air friction alone. It would be similar to a nuclear explosion. Like the speed you would need would be so fast that atoms can't move fast enough to get out of the way and would literally implode

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u/Thetacoseer Aug 17 '22

I think I've read the "What if" XKCD about a pitcher throwing a baseball at 90% the speed of light around 10 times over the course of the last 10 years or so. Basically anytime it pops into my mind. It's just so interesting

https://what-if.xkcd.com/1/

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u/rudyjewliani Aug 17 '22

A careful reading of official Major League Baseball Rule 6.08(b) suggests that in this situation, the batter would be considered "hit by pitch", and would be eligible to advance to first base.

Sounds about right.

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u/LordCthUwU Aug 17 '22

The first base, however, would be difficult to locate, much like the batter.

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u/FriedRiceAndMath Aug 17 '22

The consistency of the batter would resemble batter, though a bit thinly dispersed.

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u/dpash Aug 17 '22

This was my first though; you're going to have bigger problems than the nuclear plant if you manage to get an employee close to the speed of light.

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u/mbash013 Aug 17 '22

To mist you say?

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u/Whimsington_Storke Aug 17 '22

"Mm-hmm. And how's his wife?"

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u/burningfire119 Aug 17 '22

i mean if you really hated that employee...

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u/kent_eh Aug 17 '22

The single employee who could cause the most damage would be an executive in the accounting department

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u/MLein97 Aug 17 '22

Maybe a Maintenance Manager or the person ordering parts. I think they're hard to take down with quick actions, but long term cancer might do the trick.

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u/deVriesse Aug 17 '22

You would just get alarms that shit isn't working right. Which then goes back to the above, the most damaging employee is the executive who doesn't care about fixing "small" problems.

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u/striptofaner Aug 17 '22

No. All nuclear plants have passive security systems, and every one of them is redundant. The critical ones are fail-safe. Noone can bring a core to meltdown, even if he wished to do so. That's why there aren't terroristic attacks on nuclear plants, you can't do anything. The only way to do damage would be cutting the power lines, isolate the plant with military forces, and wait 24h for the generators to ran out of fuel. Than the core start to go in meltdown. And since all existing nuclear plants have concrete dome protecting the core, nothing will happen. No radiation, nothing. Nuclear is by far the most secure energy source.

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u/Stephenishere Aug 17 '22

Most plants keep 1 week worth of fuel

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u/ThickLemur Aug 17 '22

Just clarifying this is diesel for the generators not fuel for the reactor.

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u/Yekouri Aug 17 '22

Nuclear Power plants are also all on the emergency grid and will get fuel transported to them immediatly in case the backup generators will start turning, so they will only run out of fuel if they get completely cut off

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u/striptofaner Aug 17 '22

Didn't know that, thank you

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u/DOOFUS_NO_1 Aug 17 '22

Updates plans, buys more MREs and ammo...

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u/TheSeansei Aug 17 '22

And yet some people are brought to their knees in fear by the word nuclear and can’t get enough of that coal!

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u/Muoniurn Aug 17 '22

“Fun” fact: MRI is actually called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, but they decided to cut the nuclear part out because people would freak the fuck out. It doesn’t even have any radiation, just big-ass magnets!

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u/11hortong Aug 17 '22

The cold war did a number on our parents. We need more nuclear power until renewables become common and efficient enough to make up the majority of the grid.

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

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u/MagusUnion Aug 17 '22

Not even so much that. Thorium is such a powerful energy source that harnessing can facilitate greater discoveries in science and technology by having such power available. While renewables can be good for day-to-day living, Thorium nuclear power is reliable to be the back bone of impressive electrical and mass transit infrastructure that can cross the country.

Our society changed drastically when humanity adopted fossil fuels. Imagine such a revolution when we finally stop fearing nuclear technology.

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u/11hortong Aug 17 '22

Honestly I don't know enough about power to have a proper discussion. But it does sound exciting and just better for everyone. Carbon is the number 1 danger at the moment and anything reducing it is good in my books.

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u/MagusUnion Aug 17 '22

This is a bit of a tech heavy video by Kirk Sorensen, the 'champion' of Thorium energy. He's been a huge advocate for bringing back the discussion of this technology ever since it was abandoned back in the 70's thanks due to the Nixon administration.

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u/striptofaner Aug 17 '22

That's one of the biggest problem we have, since nuclear is fundamental to fight climate change. I suspect that lot of the fear mongering on nuclear was and is intentional, since it's the only source of energy that can replace fossil fuels in real life

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u/GreenAdler17 Aug 17 '22

Well yeah, most peoples understanding of nuclear is “big boom, lots dead, radiation poisoning, land uninhabitable”. We haven’t had “coal” drills in schools. Coal on the underhand was an industry for over 200 years and negative effects of it are often slow to accumulate and localized to small areas. Plus it’s renewable, if we ever can’t dig it we just have to act naughty and Santa will give everyone a stocking full.

Education is important to get people to accept nuclear. I don’t even know much about it other than what other people have said about it being safe and renewable.

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u/Nedyarg1100 Aug 17 '22

Even then most (if not all) nuclear reactors have the control rods defualt to closed if the reactor loses power so even if they isolated the reactor and ran the generators out of fuel the control rods would fall shutting down the core.

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u/Nedyarg1100 Aug 17 '22

I recomend watching Plainly Difficult's breakdowns of nuclear disasters. Most of the time it's humans not telling other humans important things or not maintaining the safety systems...

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u/piecat Aug 17 '22

Personnel continuity was a contributing factor to Chernobyl. But not even limited to nuclear disasters.

Happens all the time at oil refineries, chemical processing plants, etc..

Check out the USCSB on YouTube if you find this stuff entertaining/interesting

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u/Jewsd Aug 17 '22

Also WANO inspections every few years and they are tough inspections. Like, writing up staff because they didn't hold the handrail on the stairs and that could cause an incident. I understand why it's wrong and why they log it, but it is very strict.

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u/kittykittyhatesme Aug 17 '22

As a Nuclear employee, this stuff is engrained in us. Even outside of work, I feel weird even considering not using the handrail or texting while walking or something.

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u/bortsmagorts Aug 17 '22

I’m somewhat similar, but from a mining background (MSHA). I visited a manufacturing facility in another industry for an interview and I was terrified of what I saw from that ingrained, basic safety perspective. An extension cord laid across a walkway without a step cover - that’s a write up and rest of the day unpaid vacation where I’m from.

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u/FelverFelv Aug 17 '22

You should visit an auto body shop sometime... You'd have a heart attack

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u/Archaic_1 Aug 17 '22

And modern plants have a failsafe auto-scram in place that will dump the absorption rods into the core if coolent levels or temps go out of spec to shut down the reactor. They really are damn near failsafe unless you build one on an active fault at sea level where it can get cracked and then swamped by a tsunami.

(ahem, you listening Japan?)

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u/kippy3267 Aug 17 '22

Not to mention, most are built with emergency cooling pads underneath the core to prevent groundwater contamination if it melted through the entire substructure iirc

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u/Quietm02 Aug 17 '22

I'm going to say no from a nuclear incident side. Ive not worked on nuclear, but have worked at oil & has sites.

So much of it is automated safety that one person just couldn't cause a disaster, not unnoticed at least. They could certainly defeat one safety system, in which case there would be alarms and the second safety system would activate.

By the time all safety systems had been carefully deactivated it would be very, very obvious to anyone there what was happening and it would be stopped.

1 employee could cause a massive amount of damage though from an operational side. Could reasonably shut down the plant and cause an extended outage of months which could be a national security risk as no power would be generated. But it's not going to be an immediate safety risk for the sake of the nuclear side.

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

See Homer Simpson

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u/Osama_Obama Aug 17 '22

I worked at the infamous 3 Mile Island for a few weeks, and the safety manager said you could fly a fully loaded 747 into the reactor and it wouldn't put a dent into it. I think he said the dome was 12ft thick of reinforced concrete.

Also had concrete walls 4ft high and 4 ft wide around the perimeter with zigzag cutouts so people could still pass it, but no vehicle could drive through.

Oh and can't forget the very big signs warning if you walk pass the sign unauthorized they will stop you with lethal force.

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u/crash_over-ride Aug 17 '22

I have a buddy who works at a nuclear plant in the northeast as a guard.

They are heavily armed and are trained to be fairly liberal with lethal force if there's a threat to the facility.

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u/_comment_removed_ Aug 17 '22

Heavily armed is an understatement, especially for a paramilitary that answers to the DoE, not the DoD.

The people who keep the lights on will also light you the fuck up with Mk 19s and M134s on American soil.

Most people have never heard of the Federal Protective Forces, but they do not fuck around. Same goes for NASA's Protective Services.

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

[deleted]

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u/CanWeTalkEth Aug 17 '22

Not nuclear energy infrastructure under the purview of the Department of Energy.

You can absolutely sit on a hill and shoot at transformers though and then ghost yourself away apparently.

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u/Massey89 Aug 17 '22

What makes reinforced concrete so strong and is it significantly stronger than other types of walls

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u/poo_cum Aug 17 '22

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZINeaDjisY

The channel Practical Engineering has done several really interesting videos on reinforced concrete, as well as other civil engineering topics.

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

While it seems like a bizarre waste of a good plane, the 1988 experiment had a clear purpose. The government was concerned about the strength of the material, as it was used to construct nuclear reactor facilities.

The jet was traveling so fast upon impact; it shatterd into millions of tiny pieces. The only section which remained intact was the small section of the wing which missed the target entirely. While the video is mesmerizing in its magnificent deconstruction, the resulting damage to the concrete block is surprisingly minuscule.

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u/Fearmeister Aug 17 '22

Honestly, the F-4 was already an ancient plane in 1988. When you got some vehicles taking up space that you don't want to use and no one wants to buy, it's only natural to throw it against a concrete wall.

For science of course.

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u/BaggySphere Aug 17 '22

If I was the F-4, I honestly wouldn’t mind if you slammed me up against a wall. I’m into that sort of thing

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u/Scottlandissweet69 Aug 17 '22

Thats basically Aperture Science in a nutshell.

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u/worldspawn00 Aug 17 '22

We do what we must, because we can!

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u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

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u/PelicansAreGods Aug 17 '22

What if one were to nuke a nuclear power plant?

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

That would suck. It would also be a tad pointless.

If you want to just cause maximum death and destruction, then the nuke is better spent on a population center.

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u/striptofaner Aug 17 '22

It wouldn't add much to the damages of the nuclear bomb itself. Not considering the tactical benefits of permanently shutting down a reliable power source ofc

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u/Utxi4m Aug 17 '22

I'd think that transformator stations or power lines would be easier targets in that case.

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u/406highlander Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

Here in the UK, we demonstrated the safety of the casks used for transportation of nuclear fuel by crashing a British Rail Class 46 diesel locomotive (weighing 140 tonnes) pulling three standard passenger carriages (weighing around 34 metric tonnes each) into it at 100 MPH.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZY446h4pZdc

(Spoiler: Flask 1 - 0 Train)

EDIT: Much better quality video can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4IBdTceCcY

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u/anonymous2999 Aug 17 '22

Thanks. That is one tough piece of metal.

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u/frankandbeans13 Aug 17 '22 Wholesome

May the pilot rest in peace and thankyou for your sacrifice to science.

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u/Pdb39 Aug 17 '22

More like rest in pieces.

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u/nananananananana808 Aug 17 '22

How cheap and effective would kamikaze fighters be now?

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u/PelicansAreGods Aug 17 '22

From $6,000 USD and quite effective against tanks, even.

https://www.avinc.com/tms/switchblade-600

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u/WilsonX100 Aug 17 '22

I love how this website makes it seem like anyone can get these missiles. Feels like im looking into any random product 😂

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u/nessie7 Aug 17 '22

I just ordered five.

37

u/danielv123 Aug 17 '22

Sadly,

We do not currently serve hobbyist or recreational markets.

8

u/Knightbear001 Aug 17 '22

I love the fact that they have this disclaimer.

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u/pikashroom Aug 17 '22

Yeah this gives off gta internet browsing vibes

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u/hutzon Aug 17 '22

Or the fact that they are like here’s our social media guys, give us a follow!

13

u/KitchenerLeslee Aug 17 '22

They do that on purpose. They are all, at heart, just little boys in men's bodies who like to play 'Iron Man'

8

u/Ski_3143 Aug 17 '22

They do have a civilian option on their procurement form.

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u/mleibowitz97 Aug 17 '22

Holy shit that’s terrifying

46

u/CyclopsAirsoft Aug 17 '22

The US has been using these for about 10 years. They were pretty effective in Afghanistan. There's also a smaller cheaper one that's intended for infantry that's got an explosive that's basically a grenade.

They're being used by Ukraine right now.

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u/limitless_exe Aug 17 '22

Ayo i just watched an insider video about this. I'm basically an expert now

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u/pssysleyer130 Aug 17 '22

They're called missiles

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u/kempff Aug 17 '22

Yet the pilot's drivers' license was found intact in the wreckage.

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u/curse4444 Aug 17 '22

What would happen if they launched reinforced concrete into the reinforced concrete?

8

u/Not_Bekki Aug 17 '22

Asking the real questions here

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u/Melodic_Risk_5632 Aug 17 '22

Expensive way to Paint a wall.

21

u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/ConsiderationSad6271 Aug 17 '22

Air Force Accountant: Hey, General Smith! We need to find a way to hit our mandatory spending threshold!

General Smith: hold my beer…

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u/MajorArtery Aug 17 '22

Hope it had air bags.

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u/HappenedEarth72 Aug 17 '22

Unfortunately the pilot didn't survive, he forgot to put on his seat belt.

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u/GarysCrispLettuce Aug 17 '22

Would it have made a difference if the plane had a full tank of fuel?

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u/Freedom_fam Aug 17 '22

More fire boom

29

u/KindlyOlPornographer Aug 17 '22

A lot more weight, but I can't imagine it would damage the concrete. Explosions need to be focused to maximize impact.

14

u/acog Aug 17 '22

They filled the fuel tanks with water for this test at Sandia National Labs. So no extra weight.

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u/owenfromcanada Aug 17 '22

In 1988 the U.S. government wanted to see how strong reinforced concrete was got bored and a little drunk, so they...

FTFY

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u/lazzaroinferno Aug 17 '22

"My name is Johnny Knoxville and this is Jackass"

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u/ImperialKnite Aug 17 '22

My friend sent me this video when he was in the air force. He had to learn about it there. The concert uses a type of rubber as part of the aggregate. Notice how it acts like a trampoline in the impact.

75

u/InsanePurple Aug 17 '22

You and I have had very different experiences with trampolines.

38

u/warm-saucepan Aug 17 '22

Not to mention concerts.

10

u/ImperialKnite Aug 17 '22

Oh thanks I spelled concrete wrong lol

16

u/jfenton9817 Aug 17 '22

Why don’t they simply build the whole plane out of reinforced concrete

/s

7

u/MrAnonymous2018_ Aug 17 '22

Make this man a General ASAP

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u/jonuggs Aug 17 '22

Are we still doing the jet fuel and steel beams thing?

9

u/lvl66 Aug 17 '22

What about the pentagon isn’t it made out of reinforced concrete as well?

6

u/TheDownvotesFarmer Aug 17 '22

I was looking for those guys in the comments, seems that they just dissapeared

85

u/alldaywatcher Aug 17 '22

That’s to the propaganda of the anti nuclear powerplant cacklers: “… if an airplane crahes into a reactor!”

6

u/thankyeestrbunny Aug 17 '22

"Ya gotta . . catapult the propaganda."

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u/commander-wimpy Aug 17 '22

This kills the plane

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u/Voltsvargen Aug 17 '22

How do you reinforce concrete? What do you reinforce it with?

25

u/pfoe Aug 17 '22

F4 Phantoms. This video shows the injection process.

50

u/Fantastic-Storage542 Aug 17 '22

Steel beams or rods

13

u/Skatchbro Aug 17 '22 Wholesome

“In rod we trust!”

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u/AlpineOwen Aug 17 '22

Tbh, this is not really your everyday concrete slab

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u/Bachaddict Aug 17 '22

yeah it's a nuclear containment bunker. They already knew how reinforced concrete works

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u/thisisevoke Aug 17 '22

Inside job

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u/baumpop Aug 17 '22

Where were you? When they built the ladder to heaven?

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u/guff1868 Aug 17 '22

No way, the planes came from the outside

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u/iamthealpha384 Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

I think the term “slab” is a bit of an understatement here… monolith perhaps.