r/NoStupidQuestions Sep 25 '22

Are people really not using high school geometry in everyday life? Answered

[deleted]

1.1k Upvotes

1.3k

u/semajftw- Sep 25 '22

I remember telling my geometry teacher that I would never use it in real life… Then I became a structural engineer and use it all the time.

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u/JejuneEsculenta Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

17-year-old me:"Man, I'll never use this shit!" 30-year-old me:"Damn. I use this shit every day."

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u/Fuzzy_Chance_3898 Sep 25 '22

Seriously you can be dumb as a brick and use specific geometry like plumbers do to multiply to get a 45 degree length. I think it the square root of 2

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u/fleepglerblebloop Sep 25 '22

Isosceles triangle, 📐 Any triangle with dimensions 3x4x5 will create a right angle. Roofers use this all the time.

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u/kschmit1987 Sep 25 '22

Captenters too

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u/EnnissDaMenace Sep 25 '22

Not a plumber but yes that is used in engineering. Only works if the sides are the same length tho. Sqrt 3 also works for finding the center diagonal in cubes. Math is actually wild.

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u/Elaan21 Sep 25 '22

I definitely said some things about math and real life before my father reminded me of one thing...

My parents own a small construction company and the number of employees we have had over the years who did terrible in school but can do mental geometry on a jobsite is astounding. It wasn't the actual math they struggled with in school, but the presentation.

I never learned my 12s multiplication tables. But ask me how many inches in six feet and I can tell you seventy two. I refuse to embarrass myself by revealing how late in life I realized how ridiculous that was.

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u/Jeheh Sep 25 '22

/////“It wasn't the actual math they struggled with in school, but the presentation.”////

Ahh, the old those that can’t do teach. At the time I couldn’t put the words to it but as I grew older I realized how many teachers I had were terrible at teaching.

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u/Barry_Minge Sep 25 '22

Here in the UK there was a recruiting campaign for teachers a few years that had the strap line ‘you never forget a good teacher’.

Yeah, and you never forget a shit one either…

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u/bbpr120 Sep 25 '22

I sure as hell haven't- had one in college that would try to explain the actions of the British Empire during the 1700's by how a small tribe in Papua New Guinea behaved.

He was a lunatic. But once you figured out his "fill in the bubble" test pattern (he had one, every test and quiz used it), easy A.

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u/Barry_Minge Sep 25 '22

There aren’t many people in life that I have properly hated, but when I heard a few years ago that one of my old teachers had died, I laughed my socks off. I’d go and piss on his grave if I knew where it was.

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u/Meatloooaf Sep 25 '22

Once when I was in 10th grade, my mom asked me to help my 5th grade brother with his math homework cause he was struggling and he was too proud to ask. I spent a few hours walking him through things and untwisting some weird maths he was doing.

Turns out the whole class had been struggling, and for literally the next couple of months the teacher was having him come up to the front of the class occasionally to explain the concepts she didn't understand, all based on that one ~3hr session I spent with him.

I thought about teaching based on that experience but the pay vs hassle seemed pretty terrible so I noped out of that. I'm not surprised there aren't tons of quality teachers around (I did have many great ones though).

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u/Elaan21 Sep 25 '22

I struggled so hard with high school math until my parents talked to the head of the math department who asked me to come in and talk to her. Turns out, I had shitty teachers (at least for my learning style). In fairness to the other teachers, Head Math was one of the top in the country and helped write the AP Calc tests, so its almost not a fair comparison. I ended up with an A in her Calc BC class senior year.

And that wasn't the only time I ran into that. [Hopefully this makes sense because I'm trying not to ID myself here...] My school had once attracted some of the top teachers because of a local industry with an emphasis on STEM bringing lots of PhDs to the area who wanted top rate teachers for their kids. Those teachers were slowly retiring during my generation, and the difference was astounding. One or two new hires every so often were the same caliber, but most weren't. If you didn't learn the way they learned to teach, you were shit out of luck.

My school system went from Top 50 in the US my senior year to...I don't even know what by the time I finished undergrad and taught after-school drama there. One of my former English teachers [one of the old guard] all but begged me to fill a vacancy left halfway through the year, but I just...couldn't. The culture of the school had changed so drastically, it would have been an uphill battle the entire time.

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u/Jeheh Sep 25 '22

I had a geometry teacher in HS that was well into the tenure track and was a real waste of oxygen. This just wasn’t my opinion, who was I but some pimple faced high schooler but I had two older brothers that had her as well and when I being the 3rd go around that went from good grades in math to struggling my father who never felt the need to go to a Parent teacher meeting at anytime in the past felt the need to go.

When he showed up, much to his dismay he wasn’t alone in the classroom but arrived to a packed house of pissed parents trying to figure out why former straight A students, and there were many, where all having serious issues in JUST ONE CLASS.

Even looking back, while I may not be an Einstein, I’m no Forrest Gump either, and I remember my father coming back from this meeting in a pretty frustrated state. As an engineer that was pretty good at math talking to her was like talking to a wall and after talking to her and the office since there was no way to get 28 kids transferred to another class he just asked me to ask for help anytime I had an issue and we would sit down and figure it out. On more than a few occasions where some of my test scores where low, he would look at them and tell my that my math was good but it was marked wrong because it wasn’t “Her” way he got pretty frustrated with her. It was a long year in algebra…and unfortunately she was there long after I graduated ruining many kids GPAs for years to come.

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u/X0nerater Sep 25 '22

I'm still creeped out by the stats class I dropped. 1) he was one of those teachers that actually enforced dress code with a ruler, and enough people were convinced it was just so he could get close to girls legs 2) as a part of our grade, we had to follow him on Twitter and do analysis on case studies and articles and turn them in. I never understood why he couldn't post them on our homework website

On the other hand, I loved my HS calc prof. He got so hands-off at the end. I think the 2 most important things I learned in his class had nothing to do with math. 1) it's okay to fail if you learned something, which got me in trouble with history profs later on 2) how to ask my own questions and basically started with the self discipline to learn on my own for college

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u/laitnetsixecrisis Sep 25 '22

One of my high school teachers was also a bookie. He taught us probability by setting up a casino in class and explaining the maths behind each game. Quite in orthodox, but it was the only math class I passed with more than 50%

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u/themrmojorisin67 Sep 25 '22

That happened to me in 8th grade Algebra 1. Mrs. A was awful at teaching, and everyone struggled except for me. Why? Because my dad, an engineer, basically taught me what she could not. I don't think she ever realized how bad at teaching she was.

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u/herrwaldos Sep 25 '22

true, I had problems in maths because it was just numbers and theories, I got better at it when geometry started, because it had some real world resemblance - when we started physics - I got even better at maths, because I saw finally what it is about.

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u/sundancer2788 Sep 25 '22

That's because you need a through understanding to teach. It's more like those who can't teach.....

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u/lan0028456 Sep 25 '22

Teenager me: who am I going to speak English to? Nobody around me speaks it! ( I'm not English native) What am I going to do with those high school physics and math? I'll never use them in my daily life!

Also me: am an engineer working in the UK atm.

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u/Rick_QuiOui Sep 25 '22

13-year old me at school in NZ: why is French mandatory for the first year? why would I even think of electing to take it - it's not like I'll ever live anywhere they speak French.

Older me writing from Canada with Quebec clients: ...

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u/1ndiana_Pwns Sep 25 '22

I taught physics labs as a TA when I was in grad school. I'll never forget the girl who complained that trig is useless and how she'll never need it in her field. I asked what she was studying and she said forensics -_-

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u/Nulono Sep 25 '22

I know calculus is used in forensics. When is trig used?

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u/TraumatisedBrainFart Sep 25 '22

Trajectory.....

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u/bbpr120 Sep 25 '22

can't see why that would be of value, everyone knows the shooter stays put until the cops arrive for a neat and prompt arrest.

/s

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

Also calculus, linear algebra and statistics. I'm sure there are more. I'm working my ass off to get a better handle on those and trig is all up in the biz. Everything is geometry. It's the best way to understand all the math I've encountered. Algebra is a last resort haha

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u/TheCallousBitch Sep 25 '22

I would argue that measuring things, isn’t geometry.

I actually use math everyday and do a significant amount of data analytics. But not a single tangent or cosine.

What people should be saying is “Middle and High school math is teaching you how to problem solve, how to learn, how to follow a logic process in an ordered manner.”

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u/bunsNT Sep 25 '22

I’d argue that the concepts of algebra are 100X more useful than geometry in terms of day to day living but maybe I just feel that way as someone with very low spatial skills

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u/TheCallousBitch Sep 25 '22

100%

I think we all use algebra daily, even subconsciously.

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u/spaghetee_monster Sep 25 '22

I’m getting into data analytics and need to brush up my algebra 😅

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u/maxeh987 Sep 25 '22

Tangents and cosine would fall under trigonometry, not geometry.

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u/traker998 Sep 25 '22

Trigonometry would fall under geometry…. So there’s that.

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u/Piratesfan02 Sep 25 '22

People in the trades use tangent and cosine for finding proper lengths so they only have to make one cut instead of many.

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u/ThatMathBoi Sep 25 '22

most of highschool geometry is more centered around the ability to construct basic proofs rather than dimensions of objects

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u/Ural_2004 Sep 25 '22

My favorite from Geometry: CPCTC.

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u/Criminal_of_Thought Sep 25 '22

Also, when learning about congruent triangles and how to prove congruence with SSS and SAS, there's always that one kid who is like "yeah but what about ASS? Get it? Ass? I'm so funny!"

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u/calvinbsf Sep 25 '22

Tbh that kid is pretty funny

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u/breadcreature Sep 25 '22

Did a maths degree, still that kid

Succ(n) is my favourite counting notation

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u/NateDadamss Sep 25 '22

I peaked in high school

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u/Firemage007 Sep 25 '22

I was and am that kid

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u/Logical_Remove7610 Sep 25 '22

And then your teacher says no :/

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u/thechadmonke Sep 25 '22

“Corresponding parts of congruent triangles are congruent” goddamn didn’t think I’d still remember that.

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u/Logical_Remove7610 Sep 25 '22

🤣 i felt like that was just the answer to everything at one point

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u/Mountain-Long3572 Sep 25 '22

This, I can easily use Middle School or even Elementary School geometry for daily life things. Maybe if I'd ever build or renovate a home I'd need some more advanced stuff but I can easily figure out normal shit.

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u/robertomotrucker Sep 25 '22

You need trig to build a house

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u/benmwaballs Sep 25 '22

I think proofs give a good base for everyday logic. If/then statements are a gateway to 'if not for' reasoning

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u/PMmeYourbuckets Sep 25 '22

I agree! Like maybe you don’t use geometry, but you definitely use deductive and inductive reasoning on a daily basis.

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u/SmallDeadCow Sep 25 '22

Username checks out

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u/Poison675 Sep 25 '22

Everyone who has a job/ hobby that requires it uses it. Most people don't have those types of jobs.

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u/maddi0000 Sep 25 '22

I can’t think of anything I use geometry for

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u/KnowsIittle Sep 25 '22

Knowing the amount of flooring material needed to redo your floor or replace your carpet.

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u/Eilex_12 Sep 25 '22

My HS geometry was much more complex than basic area calcs

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u/saetum Sep 25 '22

My son went through this a couple years ago and I had to help him. It was torture - taking high school geometry twice! Anyway I have since used it once, and only once - online shopping, calculating the bottom width of a hexagon wall shelf using only the diameter. Which was AWESOME that I finally got to use geometry in real life besides basic calculations they teach you in grade school. Honestly the fact I know Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin has come in handy more, as I play crosswords and that's a NYT favorite.

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u/RnbwTurtle Sep 25 '22

That's not even high school geometry though, it's just length times width over and over again which is middle school at the latest

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u/maddi0000 Sep 25 '22

The flooring people do all that, I don’t replace my own floors lol

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u/NiteNicole Sep 25 '22

And certainly not like, all the time.

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u/myimmortalstan Sep 25 '22

We learn that in primary school. A good deal of high school geometry has no practical application in daily life.

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u/Fishinabowl11 Sep 25 '22

That's basic math, not geometry. Geometry is sine, cosine, and shit.

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u/SamGropler Sep 25 '22

Geometry is NOT just sine, cosine, and shit. You're getting trigonometry and geometry confused. Trig is but one aspect of geometry.

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u/ubecoffee Sep 25 '22

TIL I took trig without knowing it.

edit: this wasn't sarcasm btw

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u/Rough-Riderr Sep 25 '22

Yeah, I took Geometry but not Trig. I've heard of those terms, but I have no idea what they mean.

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u/RandomAmbles Sep 25 '22

They're just functions for how high a point is on an circle, depending on how far right, say, you've moved.

They're also how many times bigger one side of a right triangle is than another if all you know is one of the non-right angles.

Frustratingly, it's very rare for high school trig classes to actually teach you how to calculate the sine, cosine, or tangent of an angle or how those functions are actually built up and derived. (Btw, cosign is just sine shifted over a little bit. All trig functions are just Sine dressed up different ways.) Instead, they're just treated as symbolic black boxes about which all you're expected to know is some weird, mostly overcomplicated and not terribly useful identities, which are only really useful for making calculus problems marginally simpler sometimes.

Also SOH CAH TOA, which has been and continues to be an absolute banger even though the silent H in SOH is confusing as fuuuuu-

All SOH CAH TOA is, is a triplet of acronyms to help you remember which function tells you about which two triangle sides. Suppose a's one of the non-right angles in a right triangle (📐,a) Sin(a) tells you how many times bigger the hypotenuse is than the side opposite angle a.

Bam. Now you know trig and have begun your way towards becoming an ascended triangle master.

💽☸️📐

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u/salbris Sep 25 '22

It is geometry. Anything that deals with physical space is geometry, not just math related to triangles and circles. Calculating the area of a rectangle (such as a floor) is geometry, but yes it is quite basic.

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u/ShuumaVT Sep 25 '22

But OP specifically said high-school, I'm not sure how this person is using high-school level geometry to hang art on the wall but I'm curious.

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u/Dat_Boi_Travis Sep 25 '22

sine cosine and tangent are trigonometry which is a part of geometry.

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u/BeeYehWoo Sep 25 '22

I dont think anybody has mentioned it yet, but thats trigonometry.

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u/sukisecret Sep 25 '22

Sine, cosine, and tangent are trigonometry

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u/Legitimate_Roll7514 Sep 25 '22

That's trigonometry

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

Why did you type this like it’s super duper common?

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u/Frog_ona_logg Sep 25 '22

Yup. I just had to dig back into my geometry memories to figure out how much drywall I’ll need for the ceiling in my garage that has 2 slopes 😂 while thinking about it I was like what the hell I can’t believe geometry is actually useful

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u/Wolfe244 Sep 25 '22

you break out a pencil and paper to fit stuff in a room? most people dont do that

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

I honestly do! Lmfao I wish I could show you. For example, I bought two shelves and used geometry to make sure they were perfectly centered with my windows and closet doors while also equal in width to my desk, while ALSO not blocking the other furniture in my room. I think it saves time and ensures I get exactly what I imagine.

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u/Numerous-Explorer Sep 25 '22

I mean I just use a tape measure and then eye ball the rest

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u/bathshebat Sep 25 '22

I think that's cool but honestly I just eyeball everything. My brain and numbers just don't mix. I have a really hatd time with anything that involves numbers. Have you seen most people's houses? They do not give af about aethetics or optimization. At most people read the dimensions maybe when they order something and just hope it fits.

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u/papoosegoose Sep 25 '22

Oh man. At my place the best you'll get is a slap on the wall and a pat well done.

My maths consists of "yeah that'll be fine".

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u/RegularLisaSimpson Sep 25 '22

Fr I just go by vibes. It’s slower than just centering it right the first time, but this way I’m ~intuitive~

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u/dinobug77 Sep 25 '22

Honestly this is usually the way. Sometimes I measure to find the middle as a starting point but final positioning is on what looks ‘right’ not what is actually centred.

(and note to OP, dividing one number in half is def not high school level maths)

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u/Jack_Attack227 Sep 25 '22

"Wow how'd you get it perfectly centred?"

"The vibes were flowing that day man" "might have taken awhile but its perfect dude, trust the intuition man"

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u/noahjk Sep 25 '22

At my place we use geo-arm-etry. Hold your arms out to measure the item, awkwardly swivel around with your arms out, fit them into a spot where the furniture will go. presto! Thanks public school

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u/CanuckNewsCameraGuy Sep 25 '22

Dude - most people do a quick width and depth check and move on.

Some are more visual: you can do all the math and drawings in the world but I can’t picture if something will work in a room unless I physically move it around.

Which honestly terrifies me with my office plans: built in bookshelves, big desk, wall mount tv - shits going to be permanent so I gotta make sure it’s spot on the first time.

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u/Zaelot Sep 25 '22

These day you have apps that will quickly and easily give you the 3D representation to check - with the VR (like Google Cardboard), it's even more intuitive to get a sense of how it'll be.

Modern building plans are/can be BIM-based, and there are solutions that generate the 3D off of those.

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u/abutthole Sep 25 '22

Lol just measure.

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u/JP_32 Sep 25 '22

that sounds like measuring with extra steps

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u/Papercoffeetable Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

As a former carpenter we just measure the whole distance. First height, then we take the width and divide by half to know where to mark the middle, mark the middle of the shelf. Put it up against the wall marking and then we use a spiritlevel to keep it straight since most walls, ceilings, floors, doors, furnitures aren’t perfectly straight. Then mark the screw holes with a pen. Then you mount one side and check with the spiritlevel again that the previous marking will keep it straight, and finally putting in the last screws. If the previous marking will not make it straight we put the spiritlevel on top of the shelf while lifting it until it shows level and then put the last screws in while holding it level on one side.

As for which height we just put it where the customer wants it.

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u/itshima Sep 25 '22

Usually eyeballing it gets me what I want. Never had an issue with it

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u/leavmealoneplease Sep 25 '22

This is awesome, but not common

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u/that_tx_dude Sep 25 '22

Why do you think this is geometry? Why is basic measuring, in your mind, geometry?

This whole post is bizarre. Nobody is saying what you do isn’t normal, it’s like your garden variety OCD. It’s not geometry related at all though.

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u/Wolfe244 Sep 25 '22

Thats cool! I do similar things tbh, I build furniture sometimes and use a decent amount of basic geometry. Most people just eyeball stuff though, or at most do just basic measurements that dont actually need real geometry. The vast majority of people dont use sin/cos/tan outside of highschool/college

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

Oh wow, you build furniture? That’s a cool hobby to have! And yeah, math is certainly required.

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u/kinokomushroom Sep 25 '22

I break out a pencil and paper to separate a bowl of ice cream into perfect thirds lol (and believe it or not I've actually developed a technique to easily cut any bowl of ice cream with a radially symmetrical shape into perfect thirds)

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u/Embarrassed_Ad Sep 25 '22

Never once dude... literally never

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u/kottermusprime Sep 25 '22

Yeah and I hang pictures and stuff all the time. WTF is this dude talking about? Some seriously r/iamsmart vibes

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u/astolfoplzsuckmedry Sep 25 '22

mf using geometry to fill 100% of their wall with no regards to aesthetics

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u/ElliMenoPee Sep 25 '22

Big time. Nothing I saw described would warrant actual geometry - at least as most people would define geometry. Most people wouldnt class writing down lengths and widths and finding the centre as geometry.

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u/kottermusprime Sep 25 '22

Dude thinks using a level and tape measure is geometry lol

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u/jayxxroe22 Sep 25 '22

The geometry we learned in high school was, like, how to graph polynomials and how to factor the equation of a graph. Hanging art or planning the layout of something just requires measuring or possibly basic geometry like finding area or volume.

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u/EquivalentCommon5 Sep 25 '22

Polynomials and factoring were precalculus for me. Geometry was proofs which I hated but was really good at- it was just taking knowns and coming to a conclusion- dang I just now realized that’s a base of my job! Though I’ve always enjoyed math, I didn’t realize until typing this that it has impacted my many different jobs, wow! Now I appreciate it even more!

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u/skinfulofsin Sep 25 '22

As a carpenter I used geometry everyday on the jobsite.

25+ years

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u/Firemage007 Sep 25 '22

I’m not sure if they’re necessarily referring to the more practical applications of geometry you use.

Geometry in high school is considered the introductory course to developing proofs for mathematical theories. So using established theories to prove other theories.

In addition I’m sure you use the more practical functions everyday, but how often are you working with trigonometric identities? Or proving congruence of triangles?

High school geometry is your first course into a more academia sort of math. I think it’s a great course and useful, but you might be forgetting how much irrelevant stuff you learnt and focusing on what you can apply. Which is probably less than 10-20%

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u/skinfulofsin Sep 25 '22

Geometry is all I needed. I didn't take trig. Geometry just stuck in my head and to this day I apply theorems throughout the day. Everyday.

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u/Firemage007 Sep 25 '22

In my high school they were combined. Since you had it separated I can see why there would be more practical focus in geometry.

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u/poolerboy0077 Sep 25 '22

and even organize groceries

I’m curious to know what exactly you do here

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u/StealthSecrecy Real fake expert Sep 25 '22

Most people don't use that level of precision in their day to day lives.

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u/sittytuckle Sep 25 '22

OP, you don't need geometry for literally anything you're suggesting. You can definitely use it. But I can probably guarantee there are people who don't plan out shit like you do but have far better looking places

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u/lizardhamster Sep 25 '22

For real, is OP measuring his cupboard to figure out how many cereal boxes will fit? Just use your fuckin' eyeballs

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u/krisztiszitakoto Sep 25 '22

OP is type A it seems

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u/iamright_youarent Sep 25 '22

as a plumber, I use it everyday though it’s more of trigonometry a lot of times.

Basically any piping offsets can use some math calculations to make my life easier. ( a lot of right-angled triangles) some plumbers don’t or can’t use trigonometry on these tasks and it’s not the end of the world but the results definitely look better when math is implemented

Back in High school, I never appreciated and didn’t quite understand why I had to learn math but now I am eternally grateful that the past mathematicians figured all these out.

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u/warpenguin55 Sep 25 '22

I have ADHD, I just have piles of stuff everywhere.

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u/freestyle43 Sep 25 '22 Wholesome

Using a tape measure and finding out measurements is not high school math. Its basic adult shit.

When people gripr about that, they are complaining about polynomials, FOIL, equations.

No one uses that shit in real life except certain fields. Also if you've lived this long thinking your some math wizard for measuring a room and then measuring a shelf to see if it fits then I feel sad for you lol

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u/ElliMenoPee Sep 25 '22

The Dunning Kruger effect is strong with OP

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u/Adventurous-Rich2313 Sep 25 '22

I use basic math and algebra, way more than geometry. Finding the area of usually square stuff is about thr extent of it

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u/Sweaty_Assignment_90 Sep 25 '22

3-4-5 triangle to make sure things are square is it.

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u/astinad Sep 25 '22

Yes, I fucking hate planning spaces out

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u/Dolce99 Sep 25 '22

I reckon it's one of those things where if I knew how to use it, I'd find more opportunities to do so. Like most people don't need to use art skills in their day to day life, but because I have them I find opportunities to use them.

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u/fissilefidget Sep 25 '22

It really isnt. However, I never thought I would be doing chemistry, physics, or geometry in my job but I love it. Bottom line, Learn enough to have a foundation.

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u/MrMunday Sep 25 '22

The truth is, saying “most people don’t use geometry” is an understatement. It’s more like 95% of people don’t use geometry. And those who need to use it will probably need to learn them again with more advanced applications in university.

In order for humans to choose who should be studying for those, we put EVERYONE through it, and if they do poorly, we say they’re stupid.

What a Shitty system

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u/ggapsfface Sep 25 '22

I have an old piece of paper my mom sent me with the note: "remember when you were right?"

The paper had a drawing of the slab for a new garage that we were having poured, and the calculations that 13 year old me (having just finished 8th grade geometry) made that showed the concrete contractor had seriously underestimated how much product it would require. If they'd sent the truck with their estimate it would have been a fiasco. I wonder if that contractor ever found someone who understood 8th grade geometry to work for them...

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u/nevenwerkzaamheden Sep 25 '22

You should've become their funny sidekick. Going on all kinds of wacky adventures.

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u/danceswithsockson Sep 25 '22

The geometry I learned in high school? No. I’ve never had to prove a triangle was right or anything. No trig. A tiny bit of algebra once in a while. And zero of the math I learned in college, and that was a fair bit. The basic geometry of fitting furniture in my room I don’t even remember learning in school, my mom moved furniture around the house all the time and I was used for free labor, so I would be told to measure things, half them, third them, whatever, to figure out if things would fit and to center them. Although that taught me to use math at home, it also helped me develop a seething hatred for decorating houses, so no, I don’t really use geometry very often. I can say my stone mason step father used geometry every day. Dude dropped out of school in like 8th grade and could run circles around me mathematically. They were built different back then.

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u/d1duck2020 Sep 25 '22

I use it constantly at work. I track and direct horizontal directional drilling. Percent of slope over distance, limited by bend radius of product pipe or drill pipe.

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u/GhostNomad141 Sep 25 '22

I posted something like this in another thread. People learn things best when they see those things as tools to accomplish meaningful goals. The schooling system mostly only teaches skills like geometry in a very abstract context (via boring textbooks), which fails to make you understand why you should learn it.

It's like expecting people to be good at a video game by just studying the manual without actually playing the game.

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u/SickNoise Sep 25 '22

nope i have never used geometry since i git out of school.. i would not count measuring things as geometry though..

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u/Chrispeedoff Sep 25 '22

Tryna figure out the hypotenuse of my balls rn

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u/GrapplingHobbit Sep 25 '22

It’s whichever testicle is opposite the right angle, that’s the hypotenuse ball

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u/Ken10Ethan Sep 25 '22

See, I'm such an alpha gigachad that I DO just buy random shit and hope for the best.

My bed is crammed in between my massive, oversized dresser and the giant novelty lamp I thought was 3x smaller.

this is a joke i do not have a giant novelty lamp. :(

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u/Legitimate_Roll7514 Sep 25 '22

I used geometry, trigonometry, and the catesian coordinate system regularly in my career.

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u/shreddingsplinters Sep 25 '22

I use it regularly

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u/Theredman101 Sep 25 '22

They do use it. They're just unaware of it and are using natural intuition for those task.

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u/ash_tar Sep 25 '22

I skipped as much math as I could. I'll never use it! ... Need it in my job everyday.

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u/imnotwallaceshawn Sep 25 '22

Weirdly I use probability and statistics way more often than geometry, but I use both more often than algebra.

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u/Meastro44 Sep 25 '22

Got an A+ in geometry. Never use it.

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u/SummerIsABummer Sep 25 '22

I do not need geometry to measure the space around me, or if I do, I'm unaware that I use it. I can't consciously remember any geometry from high school, and it is not useful to me. I regularly use finance, statistics and algebra, otherwise I personally haven't got the patience for logical equations that do not reflect reality.

Life is too chaotic for the order and discipline of numbers. Numbers are foreign to me. I can use them, but their benefits are severely limited to me. I don't particularly enjoy doing calculations at all. It isn't satisfying to me.

I rather hate mathematics, to be frank.

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u/Asha990 Sep 25 '22

Most of us use it without knowing. When we were learning they should’ve told us the real life application in real time instead of just giving us letters and hoping we guessed the corresponding number

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u/LiverOfStyx Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Geometry? You mean trigonometry? How do you use geometry?

…do you just buy random things and hope for the best?

I make most of my stuff. I still don't understand the question... I mean, i use 90 degree angles, diameters and such but.. i rarely need to do more than to calculate area. So.. i really don't understand the question, how do YOU use geometry?

edit: wait.. do you mean.. measuring stuff? I would never call that using geometry. That is just.. measuring, dividing to half to find a centerpoint and so on.. none of that is really "using geometry".

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u/hat-of-sky Sep 25 '22

I'm a slapdash person, I don't even bake carefully, so the main thing I do to cope with the kinds of situations you listed is to keep well in mind that you always need a little more stuff, or wiggle room, or time, than you first think. So for instance there's a new sink and mirror going in my bathroom next week. The electrician installed the wall lights which can hang up or down. He put them hanging down and I asked him to flip it. Because I've measured, but I don't trust that the mirror is really going to fit between it and the sink. But I watched him, so after the mirror is set I'll have the option of flipping it back down. I replaced the screens in my screen doors myself, eyeballed it, and they're fine. I have an extra 2 feet of screen material but better than an inch too little. I get to appointments early, which often means being seen early. That's nice, but I don't get upset if I have to wait. I take the attitude that if someone else needs more time, I'm not the sickest one in the room.

But what you do is working for you and making you happy, so keep it up!

I think slapdash people like me are sometimes more flexible when life goes off the rails because we don't expect everything to go to plan. But I like organized planner people too, it's fun to watch the precise way y'all work.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

It would help for me to embrace this kind of mentality. Because I’m a perfectionist, when things go wrong, I tend to panic.

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u/hat-of-sky Sep 25 '22

My best work partner was like that. We respected each other's strengths: she'd lead the planning, I was content to follow along. But since we worked with kids, there was always that moment when it all went banana-shaped and you just had to throw in something completely spontaneous, and that's when I would take over.

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u/awakami Sep 25 '22

I haven’t once had to prove to anyone why I know a triangle is a triangle. Even pictures I just eyeball it sooo nope!

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u/DragnSerenityTardis Sep 25 '22

I don't use it intentionally, I never took algebra or geometry. My only introduction to it would have been through basic math at the end of the year to "ready" you for it next year. My senior year I took practical math, banking, taxes and such. Failed, had to go to summer school to get my diploma, its been 35 years and I still hate math.

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u/theredheaddiva Sep 25 '22

Likewise. The last time I took a high school geometry class was in 1996 and I got a D. Math has never been a strong suit of mine and if I use geometry at all it's certainly not intentional.

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u/moobectomy Sep 25 '22

I use geometry for my sewing. esp. geometry of circles for drafting circle skirts, but rectangles for pattern layouts, cones for witch hats. i make great big string compasses and use the angle measure (protractor?).

but i was also homeschooling and taught my own hs geometry, so i probably learned much more of it than people who did it in mass-schooling.

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u/sd882001 Sep 25 '22

Math teaches you to be a problem solver. You learn perseverance. It pays dividends in ways you don’r even realize. Math is awesome.

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u/LunimusREX Sep 25 '22

I use it every time I play pool.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

Yeah, now that certainly requires a lot of skill

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u/LunimusREX Sep 25 '22

To be fair, I haven't played in a while, but when I do I try to visualize the angles of where there ball could go. I'm sure lots of pool players do the same.

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u/Divilss Sep 25 '22

That’s a little different though you are visualizing/eyeballing it not doing an actual equation. It’s technically applying geometry concepts but that’s not something you needed to take a class for

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u/InsomniacSandman Sep 25 '22

Brickpaver here I use geometry every day. Fair bit of math used actually

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u/Seyorin Sep 25 '22

you mean.. you measure stuff? That isn't exactly what they're talking about

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u/genmischief Sep 25 '22

I often see people joke that high school math is a waste because “no one uses geometry in real life”, and I am so confused!

The only reply I can offer you is, "you can lead a horse to water...."

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u/slipstripsandfalls Sep 25 '22

As an archaeologist I regularly use geometry to calculate the hypotenuse of an excavation unit, whether it be a 0.5 x 0.5 m, 0.5 x 1 m, 1 x 1 m, 1 x 2 m, 2 x 2 m, etc. I also use math to calculate volumes of dirt excavated and screened for rectangular and cylindrical units.

Oddly enough, I also use geometry when hanging decorative posters in the field conex so that we can have some fun decorations to appreciate while we're bagging and tagging soil samples and artifacts.

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u/SerenumUS Sep 25 '22

While in high school I constantly made 2D games for fun in my free time. I disliked math, but over time I realized it was very useful for me. Especially Algebra and Physics, which make a lot of sense when you actually apply it. Made me realize how all of it comes together.

I'm no math freak nor am I insanely good at it (I withdrew from Calculus in college lol), but if you work on something you are passionate in and it requires it - you will most likely realize its importance. For typical jobs outside of STEM or anything related with mathematics, it won't be applicable but it is still useful imo.

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u/OutisOd Sep 25 '22

I use geometry and algebra regularly.

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u/Azdak66 Sep 25 '22

I find geometry to be critical for determining the best value when ordering pizza.

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u/Lumpy-Ad-3201 Sep 25 '22

Basic geometry is t intended to make you use it in a mathematical sense, but in more of a rationalistic sense. You may not know the dimensions of the sides of a building that is arranged as a right triangle, but you know that the side opposite the right angle is the longest instinctively. You understand that the distance around a circular object is different tha. It's diameter, etc.

Basic geometry doesn't assume you will be pursuing engineering, it assumes that you will have a better understanding of shapes and angles instinctively.

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u/im_phoebe Sep 25 '22

Exactly my thoughts, people don't use maths or science in everyday life or what, buying groceries or estimate how much fuel you need for a destination, weights, area

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u/OranMilne Sep 25 '22

I used to think I'd never use geometry in my day to day life, same with most mathematical concepts, then minecraft came out shortly after I graduated high school, and now I use it for all my big builds. I also see this reflected in real life too, but I could understand why most would think that because even in Minecraft I'd never use Y=MX+B to find the slope intercept anywhere.

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u/MyHeartIsByTheOcean Sep 25 '22

I draw 3-d geometric figures during boring meetings.

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u/evilmaus Sep 25 '22

Geometry is useful when making physical objects. When I do math, it's typically over on the probability and information theory side. But that's because I write code for auth systems.

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u/everything_in_sync Sep 25 '22

iPhones come with an app called measure. If it fits it sits.

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u/wizardball987 Sep 25 '22

I don't even think I took geometry, so if I am, it's not intentional. That said, I don't think I've measured anything in quite a while. I don't even think I use algebra that much. I might use basic math a couple times a week or so

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u/Sharesay Sep 25 '22

I made bad scores in algebra. Decent in geometry. Still not necessary in my day to day. That doesn’t mean others can’t thrive on it. Kudos for those who can

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u/DefiantLogician84915 Sep 25 '22

Depends on what you do. Personally I’ve never used anything past basic algebra after graduating and it’s been nearly a decade.

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u/-Sugarholic- Sep 25 '22

That sounds more like grade 4-6 geometry than High School geometry to me.

Sounds like you are talking about angles and basic shapes rather than the heavier stuff you are taught in high school and never use again unless you become an engineer or something like that...

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u/birdboxisgood Sep 25 '22

Shut up nerd

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u/jeango Sep 25 '22

I make games, so, like, yeah all the time

But your definition of high school geometry seems a bit off. Like, measuring distances and seeing if things are parallel or in line… that’s more elementary school geometry

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u/Jasole37 Sep 25 '22

I was a carpenter for 10 years and I didn't use the geometry that I used in highschool ever. Had to learn a more ad hoc geometry.

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u/ImpossibleGore Sep 25 '22

Everything you're using geometry for is something I just as easily eyeballed.

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u/sluttypidge Sep 25 '22

Nah I just hung things up where I thought they were nice. And just had someone else hold larger pieces so I could see about how high I needed to hang large pieces. No measuring involved. Just pure artistic aesthetic that I and probably many other have cultivated.

In fact I was always more worried about finding a stud and not perfect placement.

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u/NegiB96 Sep 25 '22

From india, that is all basic middle school geometry that you mentioned. In highschool we have trigonometry with differential and integral calculus

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u/ShuumaVT Sep 25 '22

How do you mean you are using it for those things?

Just measuring things is not high-school geometry

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u/Badknees24 Sep 25 '22

I did school level maths and A Level maths, and then followed a science career and I have honestly never used much of it beyond basic equations. I truly did not need sin, cos, tan... imaginary number, quadratic equations, simple harmonic motion, any of it. I have used a bit of Pythagoras when I needed to work out something for home renovations but I learned that when I was about 10.

I always felt it would be more useful to teach kids about mortgage rates, what APR means, what different bank accounts are and how student loans work etc.

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u/dcheesi Sep 25 '22

(Very basic) Geometry, yes; Trigonometry, no.

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u/redzaku0079 Sep 25 '22

There are fucking orderlies who cannot eyeball a thirty degree angle. Yes, I'm serious. Doctors leave instructions on how patients are to be treated. Doctor stated that patient must be seated at a thirty degree angle to aid in feeding and digestion. I see this person at around fifteen degrees. I ask about it and they say he's at thirty. I ask to show me. Takes me to the patient and insists it's thirty. I download an app on my phone to measure the angle. It wasn't even at fifteen. Adjust the backrest on bed. Demonstrate what thirty degrees looks like.

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u/gyhiio Sep 25 '22

Idk about others, but I certainly don't use most of the time. What I do use, however, is the knowledge that the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell.

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u/Key-Iron-7909 Sep 25 '22

Geometry was my struggle class in high school. Maybe that’s why I have my partner do all the luggage jenga when we travel 🤔💡

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u/Gurganus88 Sep 25 '22

I load tank barges for a living. I use geometry to figure out temperatures corrections, API gravity blends, temperature blends, calculating draft loads ect. Ect. I use it everyday.

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u/redditusercameron Sep 25 '22

I guess that’s what we do? I don’t know. I have plenty of decorations and items around me, and never did any structural planning around it. I’m happy in my space, no geometry needed

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u/unapproved_dentist Sep 25 '22

Genuinely had to google what geometry was, so I doubt I been using it in real life

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u/Puzzleheaded_Age6550 Sep 25 '22

I understand. People will say that they're not using algebra, either. I always explain how they're using it every day!

People just don't know how they've been applying concepts to real life.

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u/Fine_Baseball6921 Sep 25 '22

Most of what we use daily isn’t high school level geometry. It’s pretty much stuff we learn in elementary and middle school.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

Yes, absolutely! The real-world applications are vast. Maybe our education system needs to be better about connecting our lessons to what’s happening in the world around us.

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u/BEAT-THE-RICH Sep 25 '22

I was planning how much ground I had to level for our new cubby house, which 1 wanted sittings at a 45 degree angle in the corner of the yard. Had to pull out the ol' Pythagoras theorem. The answer I needed ended up being 101 cm so I rounded down.

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u/mdawgkilla Sep 25 '22

How do we use algebra in everyday life?

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u/ApartRuin5962 Sep 25 '22

I think a lot of people never use geometry after high school because they never do any art or design for the rest of their lives, which is really sad.

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u/Psychological_Tap187 Sep 25 '22

I think most people use it daily but because it has been drilled in our heads so much we don’t realize it most of the time. Believe it our not guys it’s second nature.

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u/Abalone_Admirable Sep 25 '22

I don't even know what geometry is 😂

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u/Kuzcopolis Sep 25 '22

You use elementary school geometry for those things.

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u/TravelingSnarker Sep 25 '22

No, I am abysmal at all math. So I got a husband who does all of that for me 😬 I haven’t use geometry since 11th grade!

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u/Firm-Boysenberry Sep 25 '22

I have used so many times in my life that I ended up taking a free online refresher course

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u/shuozhe Sep 25 '22

Rarely for job, but a lot for hobbies (3d printing, make video game).

Most of the time I don't need all the formulars, just what it's called so I can find it easier

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u/Party_Nail Sep 25 '22

I used geometry to figured out at which distance my eyes must be, from my 51" screen knowing that horizontal plan of image must represent 30° of my view.

I also used geometry to get the water volume of my pool to calculate how many btu I need to put in water to heat it at desire temp.

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u/Jawn82004300 Sep 25 '22

Tetris, parking vehicles, puzzles, etc.

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u/Beluga_Artist Sep 25 '22

I can’t say I use geometry in my every day life. I’ll measure things with a tape measure or ruler sometimes but most stuff is just eyeballed. I use minor bits of algebra for work and conversions if I don’t have my phone handy but that’s really about it as far as anything more complex than arithmetic on the regular.

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u/Asatsuki Sep 25 '22

i don't use geometry pretty much ever. because i dont build gardens or furniture, i just buy the furniture. at most, the biggest benefit i get from geometry regularly is that i'll J-walk sometimes but not directly across, the street, but instead diagonally towards the direction i'm going because i know walking down the hypotenuse is shorter than the two sides.

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u/ladygreyowl13 Sep 25 '22

It’s more that people don’t realize they use it in every day life, the same with algebra