r/technology Sep 04 '22 All-Seeing Upvote 2

The IRS says it mistakenly made public data for about 120,000 taxpayers Security

[deleted]

14.3k Upvotes

2.0k

u/HTC864 Sep 04 '22

If I didn't already know what this was the headline would've confused me. But to save a click:

"Taxpayer names and business contract information are among the data that was inadvertently disclosed, Roth said. But sensitive data like social security numbers, income information, or "other sensitive information that could impact a taxpayer's credit," were not released."

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u/autumnbringer Sep 04 '22

But sensitive data like social security numbers, income information, or "other sensitive information that could impact a taxpayer's credit," were not released."

Yeah, you still have to pay someone online to get those ever-so-secret 9 digit numbers.

631

u/tom_fuckin_bombadil Sep 05 '22 edited Sep 05 '22

American's reliance on SSN and the fact that it's supposed to be "secret" is mindboggling.

Want to apply to rent an apartment? Gotta send your SSN to the landlord, lease agent or building management company.

Need to do any government related things (like getting a drivers license)? need an SSN

I go to the bank and want to do something with my account or get a credit card? Welp, gotta give my SSN to verify identity and for credit checks.

Need to handle some financial matters on the phone such as dealing with 401k, insurance or other benefits? Gotta give the random person in the call center my SSN to verify my identity.

As a recent newcomer to the US, I have given my SSN to so many people in the past 6 months. I have had to repeat it so often (due to being on the phone with various insurance, bank and workplace getting everything in order) that I've memorized it. I can barely remember 3 digits of my home country's SSN equivalent and I've had that all my life! And then I get warned to keep it at home because if I misplace it, someone can steal my identity.....as if the call center person making minimum wage or the sketchy landlord/leasing agent that I've just told all my personal info to is somehow not capable of doing that themselves

205

u/UncleGeorge Sep 05 '22

Yah that system is so fucked, I don't know how the hell identity theft isn't more of a massive issue in the US considering that stuff

150

u/rmorrin Sep 05 '22

I'm pretty sure it was never meant to verify identity and people just started using it for that

106

u/[deleted] Sep 05 '22

[deleted]

12

u/BeatitLikeitowesMe Sep 05 '22

This immediately came to mind

46

u/ahab_ahoy Sep 05 '22

It still says right on the card itself, not intended for identification purposes

36

u/rmorrin Sep 05 '22

is used for identity EVERYWHERE

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u/stevedave_37 Sep 05 '22

It's for social security (hence the name).

3

u/Dr-McLuvin Sep 05 '22

Get out of town!!!

35

u/almisami Sep 05 '22

Also because Americans refuse to actually get a National ID that would have security features. Just like they refuse universal healthcare.

SSN was chosen because, out of all the options, it is the most universal document available.

10

u/rmorrin Sep 05 '22

But that's socialism! Or communism! I don't know which but it's definitely something bad! It's not like the government already knows everything about us

5

u/Gfgd420 Sep 05 '22

No guy, it's obviously fascism

/s for fuckheads

2

u/almisami Sep 05 '22

The IRS actually has a more comprehensive ID system, but they don't actually care about citizenship so obviously that was rejected.

2

u/Yadobler Sep 05 '22

The best best thing is drivers license, which is why I always found it weird that you get IDed with one, since my country uses National ID card and not everyone drives

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u/Odd_Local8434 Sep 05 '22

It is, a lot of it is just taken care of without the rest of us noticing. Financial and insurance institutions have giant fraud security departments that routinely cancel credit cards, reverse charges, investigate fraudulent claims, and flatly eat the cost of fraudulent financial transactions all the time. The types of information that wasn't leaked from the IRS was probably leaked when the credit agencies got hacked several years back.

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u/peroxidex Sep 05 '22

Information accessed in the breach included first and last names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some instances, driver's license numbers for an estimated 143 million Americans, based on Equifax' analysis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Equifax_data_breach

7

u/GD_Bats Sep 05 '22

I still keep my accounts frozen save for a couple of days when I am planning to apply for something just because of such incidents

21

u/mAC5MAYHEm Sep 05 '22

Just gotta be mindful about who your giving the number too. And if that fails there are many ways to check if your identity has been used unlawfully. Security has come a long way.

51

u/bonedoggey Sep 05 '22

Except when one of the biggest handlers of credit in the US uses a generic default password as their password. coughs Equifax

24

u/LuckyCharmsNSoyMilk Sep 05 '22

Remember when we were supposed to get paid for that? Good times.

25

u/Wheresthecents Sep 05 '22

I remember when they immediately started charging to clean up the mess they made via their negligence.

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u/GD_Bats Sep 05 '22

12345? That's amazing, I've got the same combination on my luggage.

1

u/[deleted] Sep 06 '22

Love a good spaceballs reference

10

u/tom_fuckin_bombadil Sep 05 '22

What are some ways to check if your identity has been stolen or used?

50

u/orclev Sep 05 '22

There are no good ways. The least bad way is to get a copy of your credit report. In theory you can do that I think twice a year for free, but in practice the credit report companies obfuscate and hide that as much as possible to try to get you to pay for a credit report. Even then you need to be able to figure out what obscure entry on your report is something you've legitimately incured and what might be a fraudulent entry that could be a sign of identity theft. The whole thing is a mess and anyone trying to say the US system is anything but horrible is either a moron or making money off the system.

15

u/PerceptiveAxion Sep 05 '22

Request Your Free Credit Report:

Online: Visit AnnualCreditReport.com.

By Phone: Call 1-877-322-8228.

https://www.usa.gov/credit-reports

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u/creamersrealm Sep 05 '22

It's utterly stupid. They originally started out for retirement purposes and then people realized "Hey a national ID number would be useful but that socialism! I know let's use SSNs!!! Most everyone has one the the government already maintains it!"

Freaking idiot morons...

31

u/bravejango Sep 05 '22

That’s socialism let’s use a “social” security number.

7

u/Sluggerjt44 Sep 05 '22

Right! Other countries have much better options than our paper ssn card.

37

u/sabot00 Sep 05 '22

Everyone has their SSN memorized

20

u/xenokilla Sep 05 '22

Everyone has their SSN memorized

Shit, I have yours memorized.

10

u/miktoo Sep 05 '22

That always remind me of that Lifelock CEO who used his real SSN to advertise the product. He's been a victim of identify theft at least 13 times.

3

u/VxJasonxV Sep 05 '22

Former* CEO

7

u/GD_Bats Sep 05 '22

No lie, for some reason when I worked for Sears they had us using our legal SSNs to log in to their janky antique POS (Point of Sales, but really, Piece of Shit) system, and it would require a manager to do the same to override things. I had a legit reason to request such an override, but because this piece of shit point of sales system was like from 1979 there was no way for him to do it remotely, so he ended up giving me his own SSN over the phone to put these overrides in, and I ended up memorizing his SSN for a time. If I were a POS myself I could have really, really abused that (and he was a shit manager, so there was temptation...)

12

u/Archer007 Sep 05 '22

Yep, that's why they need to publish everyone's SSN to make it worthless as a means of authentication

3

u/[deleted] Sep 05 '22

Right, that's why this headline is such a joke. Everyone already has all your data and in far less secure places than the IRS.

6

u/cjandstuff Sep 05 '22

When the US first started using them, it was ilegal to be used for identification. If you can find someone old enough, their social security card will actually have on the back of it, something like “not to be used for identification”.

2

u/rsicher1 Sep 05 '22

When I was in college our SSN was basically our "password" for all administrative related stuff.

2

u/raddishes_united Sep 05 '22

“Quick Vicki! What’s your social security number?” “851-23-9327.” “That’s very impressive.” “It’s the only thing I ever truly learned in college.”

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u/bikwho Sep 05 '22

I'm pretty sure every single American has had their private data exposed. Even the credit bureaus have leaked our private data.

5

u/Suspicious-Relief-31 Sep 05 '22

Just received notice 9/2 from Samsung . **you have been notified, WTF ! NO NEXT STEP. just notification?

3

u/jBlairTech Sep 05 '22

Well, yeah; they f!cked up, so fixing it is on you. Naturally… /s

To be fair, though, they may just be following protocol. They found out and immediately contacted people to be on the lookout while they assess the damage and possible next steps. Hopefully, anyway.

Edit for autocorrect

44

u/p0ultrygeist1 Sep 05 '22

I can just go on ancestry.com and get a bunch of dead peoples SSN

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u/Telid Sep 04 '22

But sensitive data like social security numbers, income information, or "other sensitive information that could impact a taxpayer's credit," were not released

Don't worry. I think Experian leaked that info a couple years ago for every single person in the US.

253

u/[deleted] Sep 04 '22

[deleted]

164

u/Telid Sep 04 '22

You're right, my mistake. Equifax, not Experian. The Experian breach was only 15M T-Mobile customers.

Also, that leak was 5 years ago? Time since 2019 has lost meaning.

48

u/AggravatingBite9188 Sep 04 '22

Thought I was supposed to get a payment at some point in my life. I even filled crap out.

48

u/Stepjamm Sep 05 '22

Shareholders and banks first bro, you’ll get what’s left

14

u/hornsounder9 Sep 05 '22

Shareholders get paid last. They are literally “residual claimants,” entitled to the residue.

20

u/Stepjamm Sep 05 '22

When payday loans got busted, it wasn’t the people who they ripped off who got paid first. It was shareholders and banks. Everyone else for pennies to the pound on their original claims.

Just saying what I’ve seen happen.

2

u/hornsounder9 Sep 05 '22

That’s payday, they’re already the scum of the earth. Reputable companies pay the shareholders last

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u/red286 Sep 05 '22

A "payment"? Naw man, you got to sign up for a free year of their credit monitoring service so they'd let you know if someone was using your identity to obtain credit. After the first free year, it's only $4.95/mo to keep an eye on the fact that your data is out there, available for someone to use, and nothing can change that fact now.

Basically, they turned their "leak" into a massive long-term revenue generator.

2

u/rsicher1 Sep 05 '22

Amazing they were able to come out of this better off.

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u/Why_T Sep 05 '22

Time stopped in 2020. We still need a new method to measure time.

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u/-doobs Sep 05 '22

psh only 15M. no biggie lol

23

u/KeepTheChange_YFA Sep 05 '22

147 million users info leaked, good times.

Actually had my identity stolen after that. Jokes on them though, bet they were disappointed!

14

u/Wadka Sep 05 '22

OPM also did it for every government employee and anyone who'd ever applied for a security clearance back in 2015. Thanks Uncle Sam.

2

u/podrick_pleasure Sep 05 '22

I got two years of credit monitoring though so it's all good.

2

u/Wadka Sep 05 '22

Same. ChiComs will definitely give up after 2 years.

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u/C0meAtM3Br0 Sep 05 '22

This made me lol:

“Confidential data from some Form 990-Ts…was accessible to download on the IRS.gov website's search engine for about a year… The IRS took immediate steps to address the issue,"

Huh?

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u/HTC864 Sep 05 '22

They took action once they found out about it.

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u/No_Lingonberry3224 Sep 05 '22

Hey they said the same thing about the OPM hack initially, then provided us with free credit check, then they told us they got the entire sf 50 file….

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u/w3bCraw1er Sep 05 '22

Dude’s name is Roth? 🤣 He is made for taxes, investment advise etc.

3

u/ObamasBoss Sep 05 '22

Right, that sensitive data costs more and was not part of the free trial.

2

u/sandm000 Sep 05 '22

So they got the names of 120,000 taxpayers? Isn’t that more or less 1 white pages?

0

u/TakYimely Sep 05 '22

Said it before and I’ll say it again. Fuck the IRS

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u/CombatConrad Sep 04 '22

Target says that you gotta get the numbers up.

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u/megamanxoxo Sep 05 '22

Laughs in credit score companies that people didn't even send them info nor do they want around but get all your info and leaked it anyways

12

u/13igTyme Sep 05 '22

Would be perfect for that "Amateurs!" meme. Just include Equifax.

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u/ahumanlikeyou Sep 05 '22

Sony says, challenge accepted

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u/ZapateriaLaBailarina Sep 05 '22

The IRS is required to notify Congress of any incident involving more than 100,000 individuals under the Federal Information Security Modernization Act.

The "incident" part is a bit concerning. Is the 100k cumulative or can they make a dozen 50k mistakes without reporting anything?

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u/GGme Sep 05 '22

Why is there any minimum? If they inadvertently release one person's data, they should have to report.

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u/skywaters88 Sep 05 '22

It’s the same with health care. When it hits a certain number then it must be reported.

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u/Daviroth Sep 05 '22

To the governing body, any incident must be reported to the patient.

4

u/RandomNumsandLetters Sep 05 '22

I'm speculating but maybe it happens so often the number of reports would be overwhelming and the big leaks would get lost in the mix of small leaks

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u/HP844182 Sep 05 '22

The "incident" part is a bit concerning. Is the 100k cumulative or can they make a dozen 50k mistakes without reporting anything?

Well for tax purposes if you make ten $999 deposits to stay under a $1k max deposit limit to skirt reporting, that's called "structuring" and you go to jail.

So I'm sure it's the dozen 50k mistakes without reporting for them.

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u/monsieur_mungo Sep 05 '22

For fucks fucking sake! Can anyone keep fucking private data safe? Several years ago I worked for a company who had a major hacker breach where literally every single, hundreds of employees, got their W2s stolen. Who did my former employer hire to “protect” this sensitive information? Yes, Equifax! Equifax, who shortly after, got their stupid asses hacked! The fuck! This makes me so angry to keep hearing this shit. Why can’t companies and GOVERNMENT AGENCIES get their security together?!

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u/dangolo Sep 05 '22

Security is always seen as a money black hole by executives.

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u/Jojotheebonicmonkey Sep 05 '22

I can kinda see it in that way also…. Anything via internet is never technically private nor secured/secretive. Smartphones are devices, individuals who use the devices are essentially the product. I find it interesting that data mining isn’t discussed thoroughly, nor the ramifications behind collection.

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u/GruePwnr Sep 05 '22

That's not true at all. If you follow proper security guidelines then the only people who can hack you are high level government agencies like the NSA. 99% of people just think like you and figure it's better to save money.

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u/SwagDaddy_Man69 Sep 05 '22

Security has always taken a second seat for a lot of companies. Hopefully, it’s starting to seem like times are changing, security is getting more prioritized

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u/BagOnuts Sep 05 '22

Nope. My wife just got her identity stolen. Likely from the Equifax breach. Fortunately it’s so fucking common these days it’s pretty easy to deal with for the most part. The worst part is knowing the crazy amount of waste/fraud resulting from it drives up the prices of everything.

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u/Beyondintodarkness Sep 05 '22 edited Sep 05 '22

Don't get pissed at the IRS. They're the least liked most underfunded government agency due to Republicans constantly cutting their funding so they can't update anything or hire anyone. Hell, a significant portion of IRS systems still run on COBOL so old all the programs were written by people now retired that they have to contract at significant expense to update.

If it makes you feel any better only normally publicly accessible information was released.

Edit: fixed spelling

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u/flyingquads Sep 05 '22

I studied software engineering and one of our teachers used to take freelance COBOL jobs for €1000 a day.

Of course we asked him why he would teach for a 6k salary a month if he could make 1k a day. He quit his teaching job a year later, lol.

And for context: it's not just government agencies still using COBOL. Banks are also still running mainframes and lots of COBOL software.

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u/marx2k Sep 05 '22

My uncle works for UPS. Is a COBOL programmer

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u/Daviroth Sep 05 '22

Some modern business run on modern mainframes. There's benefit to them in certain contexts.

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u/Tzunamitom Sep 05 '22

If you knew how much banking infrastructure was run on COBOL you’d have a seizure.

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u/jBlairTech Sep 05 '22

No one should, as it’s still in the top 20 most popular languages.

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u/PandaGoggles Sep 05 '22

The main database is COBOL, and everyone uses it all day for everything. Different applications sit on top of it and interact with it, but most people need to interact with it directly. Still green text and everything. It’s wild stuff.

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u/rupe_89 Sep 05 '22

And go find a COBOL programmer to hire, good fucking luck lol

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u/WHYAREWEALLCAPS Sep 05 '22

KOBOL

I think you mean COBOL. Given it is an acronym for COmmon Business Oriented Language, spelling is important.

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u/monsieur_mungo Sep 05 '22

Yes, thank you for snapping me out of my rage. Still, how many data leaks do we read about every year? It’s obscene. It’s happened to so many people and, often time, our personal data is handled outrageously poor. It sucks to find out how terribly it was handled until it’s being sold for pennies on the dollar on the dark web.

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u/GenericRedditor0405 Sep 05 '22

Yeah I hear you, it’s super fucking frustrating that far and away the biggest risks to my own identity are the multiple massive security breaches at major companies. It sucks that we’re constantly on the hook for companies’ fuck ups

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u/jmfranklin515 Sep 05 '22

Government agencies like the IRS are drastically underfunded by regimes who want to keep taxes outrageously low (on big business). Thankfully Joe Biden (AKA Dark Brandon) recently signed a bill that would increase funding for the IRS such that over 80,000 new employees could be hired—let’s hope that some of those are going to be involved in web infrastructure and cybersecurity.

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u/NOT_being_sarcastic_ Sep 05 '22

dont worry, you can sue the government for compensation.. wait..

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u/powercow Sep 05 '22

H&R Block is going to be so annoyed, that the government gave for free what H&R likes to sell.

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u/talltree1971 Sep 05 '22

How is public data made and how did that data make it past an editor?

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u/sinocarD44 Sep 05 '22

It's not like it matters. At least half of the population's data is already in the wild. Thanks equifax.

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u/ExceptionEX Sep 04 '22

Man just think of the loss in revenue they could have gotten selling it to 3rd parties. Government waste at its finest :(

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u/[deleted] Sep 05 '22

What is the point of even telling us, nothing is going to happen for their mistakes. They wont be held accountable anyway.

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u/Urban_Savage Sep 05 '22

But keep telling me lies that changing my password every week with insane requirements is gonna keep my data safe. Data breaches are server side 99.99999% of the time. Everything they say about password security is just like plastic recycling... a lie designed to put the responsibility on the consumer, even though the vast majority of all pollution is industrial and plastic recycling gets dumped in the ocean.

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u/FPSXpert Sep 05 '22 edited Sep 05 '22

By this point with all the emails popping up in my inbox of companies going ''we're sowwy we lost your data'' i'm losing my cool over this. It's getting easier by the day to make your list ''companies that haven't been hacked for being stupid cheapskates'' rather than the other way around.

Hey maybe this is the endgame, if everybody hacked nobody is. Maybe in 50 years the existing credit system will be so FUBAR'd that we just go back to physical bank interviews for security and wall off the old internet NetWatch style.

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u/Dirtsurgeon1 Sep 05 '22

When Gov. Says oops, you know you’d be in jail.

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u/KickBassColonyDrop Sep 04 '22

Most government agencies have garbage security posture. Shocked I tell you. Shocked.

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u/Free_Landscape_5275 Sep 05 '22

Filed that with a 1040 WHOOPZ

3

u/Ok-Refrigerator6390 Sep 05 '22

So we are funding another 80,000 irs soon to be bureaucratic workers to make this even more possible. Perfect.

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u/protosser Sep 05 '22

Thats ok, Equifax did similar shit for like over half the country...but BOOOOOST with john CCPPena

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u/Separate-Owl369 Sep 04 '22

Was one of the taxpayers, Donald Trump? Checking for a friend.

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u/Flipnkraut Sep 05 '22

It said tax payer, so no.

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u/Separate-Owl369 Sep 05 '22

Good eye. I wasn’t paying attention much like trump doesn’t pay taxes.

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u/johnnycyberpunk Sep 05 '22

Maybe, but we won’t get to see it for two more weeks.

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u/[deleted] Sep 05 '22

so thats what they are going to go with? they know they got hacked. all of the circles are talking about it.

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u/Darrell77 Sep 05 '22

Another reason the rich don't pay taxes

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u/Slippinjimmyforever Sep 05 '22

Again?! They already leaked my info a few years ago. Dumb pricks.

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u/bigvon75 Sep 05 '22

Not. One a millionaire or politician isn’t that odd

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u/Sirgolfs Sep 05 '22

Nice. As we still wait for our tax returns. Anyone else?

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u/mordecai98 Sep 05 '22

Send me you name, dob and ssn. I'll check if your info has been compromised.

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u/[deleted] Sep 04 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/East_Onion Sep 05 '22

why is the IRS allowed to dox people?

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u/1Originalmind Sep 05 '22

And none of them were trump?

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u/[deleted] Sep 04 '22

[deleted]

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u/Kind_Committee8997 Sep 04 '22

Most groups that have massive layoffs and re-hirings every 4-8 years will most likely have some hiccups in the way they function.

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u/TheForceIsWeakWithTh Sep 04 '22

Is it because they're ironically underfunded? I'll never understand how "1 dollar spent brings in >1$" failed to market itself.

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u/n3w4cc01_1nt Sep 04 '22

I don't think the gov't was ever allowed to or intended to function as promised. if it's not an outside threat then it's extremists in its own ranks causing fiascos then if it's not them some jackassian trend gets the youth into self destructive patterns.

education is being limited in the name of profit.

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u/HTC864 Sep 04 '22

Based on what?

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u/freemydogs1312 Sep 04 '22

Well, this is one. It went on for a year. Thats terrible security.

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u/Azifor Sep 04 '22

In 2016 a larger one happened that included social security numbers.

Edit: 2015. 2016 they were still determining numbers.

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u/HTC864 Sep 04 '22

I don't get how that means they continue to be "embarrassment of an agency". But if it makes sense to you, then great.

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u/DarkCosmosDragon Sep 04 '22

If an agency literally paid to keep your shit out of the public eye fails to do that multiple times I consider that a fucking embarassment

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u/astrobro2 Sep 05 '22

Even more embarrassing is when a company leaks more than half of americas social security info, let’s the executives sell stock prior to the news dropping, make insane amounts of money, escape punishment and then the average person affected gets a free year membership to credit karma.

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u/[deleted] Sep 04 '22

[deleted]

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u/DodGamnBunofaSitch Sep 04 '22

funny way of saying 'republicans systematically defunded the IRS to the point they can't afford to spend money going after the 1% who can throw endless money at lawyers to stymie accountability.'

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u/HTC864 Sep 04 '22

At no point has the IRS ever made a statement to that point. What they have said is Congress cut their budget so much over the last decade plus, so they couldn't afford to hire more of the agents that handle complex tax returns. So those returns aren't getting processed as quickly as the easier ones.

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u/philipkmikedrop Sep 04 '22

I’m going to basically agree with you but also add some additional nuance:

The 1% are almost always following the tax rules. They can afford to pay for expensive law firms and CPAs to review and submit their taxes. An audit is not going to yield a return since they’re audited pretty much every year anyway.

The ones who get screwed are your mom and pop small businesses that mess something up trying to do it themselves.

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u/nxhrnsjdns Sep 04 '22

Remember when the IRS got a shit ton of funding and acted like they were going to go after the 1% and instead just went even harder at regular people

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u/LeCrushinator Sep 04 '22

I don’t remember, is there a source for this?

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u/suprahelix Sep 05 '22

No because this never happened

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u/innercenterdinner Sep 04 '22

You defend the IRS, cool bro 👍

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u/HTC864 Sep 04 '22

More that I don't enjoy stupidity.

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u/nyc_2004 Sep 04 '22

You literally said “based on what” in a comment on a post about a massive failure of theirs 😂

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u/HTC864 Sep 04 '22

The comment implied that the IRS was already a source of embarrassment before this. This mistake, while not desired, seems to have released information of a relatively low number of people, most of which would already be public. (Compared to every other data breach we hear about weekly.) So my question was to find out what else they've done to be deemed an embarrassment.

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u/Zeplar Sep 05 '22

It's one of the most efficient government agencies and one of the notable cases where the government works better than private businesses. When we tried outsourcing the IRS the private companies each did worse.

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u/AWSMJMAS Sep 05 '22

Glad we're adding 80 thousand of those dolts

4

u/suprahelix Sep 05 '22

Maybe it's good we add more employees so the ones they have aren't overstretched.

1

u/saucyzeus Sep 05 '22

You need double hires with all the retirements coming.

4

u/1_useless_POS Sep 04 '22

Ctrl-F, Trump...

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u/curly123 Sep 04 '22

I'm pretty sure you need to pay taxes to be on an IRS list.

3

u/Mckenney99 Sep 04 '22

Just a mistake huh? This seems more then just a mistake this a colossal failure of privacy protection. The IRS deserves to be lit up far more in the media for this lack of consternation. 120,000 is more then just a mistake some people will probably be fired for this then again maybe not is is a government job and they love not taking any responsibility.

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u/guymn999 Sep 05 '22

Is there a legitimate reason to not make tax info public?

1

u/[deleted] Sep 05 '22 edited Oct 10 '22

[deleted]

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u/rupe_89 Sep 05 '22

The article states it was a leak of 990-T’s for tax exempt organizations. Personally I believe the finances of tax exempt businesses be made public in the degree of disclosure mentioned in the article. The public should have the right to know why people ARE NOT paying taxes.

2

u/Naisu_boato Sep 05 '22

Wonder what these 120k people did to piss off the government. In the government there are no “accidents”...

4

u/BigDickLarry42069 Sep 04 '22

Is that what them 85,000 new recruits did smh

2

u/YggdrasilsLeaf Sep 04 '22

Who were the 120,000?

Regular citizens? Or the 1%?

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u/The_Incredulous_Hulk Sep 04 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Considering it said 120,000 TAXPAYERS, it's safe to say that the 1% weren't affected.

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u/kirlandwater Sep 04 '22

Nice, now can they process my damn return?

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u/Metraxis Sep 04 '22

Paper returns for individuals are running at 6 months+. E-filed returns are running at 2 Thursdays and a Monday. So, in a word, no.

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u/kirlandwater Sep 04 '22

Mines paper bc my new tax guy is a moron, I love waiting 6+ months for my refund, and likely closer to a year for the amendment I already sent in bc the aforementioned tax guy is again, a moron

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u/Metraxis Sep 04 '22

If Where''s My Refund? shows no available information, then your return has not posted, and you could conceivably get a late e-filed return processed before your paper return. The penalty for filing late is calculated as a percentage of the tax unpaid on the due date of the return, so assuming you paid everything on time, you could be on the hook for a maximum of 25% of $0.

Also, if your tax guy is a moron, why is he still your tax guy?

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u/kirlandwater Sep 05 '22

This is our first, and last, year using him. Was after he received high praise from family members who I now realize just don’t know any better

2

u/Metraxis Sep 05 '22

Fair enough.

(For the peanut gallery: If your tax guy does any non-mandatory paper filing, he's either an idiot or a crook, possibly both. If you have mandatory paper filings, you don't need suggestions from Reddit. Ask at the country club like everyone else.)

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u/jsho31 Sep 05 '22

I'm still waiting on both 2020 and 2021, so you aren't alone

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u/RalphaDog Sep 05 '22

Just skimming these comments I’m surprised how many people are complaining that the IRS is being given more funding and referencing this as a reason why not to. But isn’t the logical argument the exact opposite? This indicates to me, granted as a layman, that if they were better funded with more resources these “fuck ups” as many people put it would be less likely as they will be able to update and improve their processes. Their budget has been slashed year after year and this is likely a result of lack of resources, not more.

2

u/Atolic Sep 05 '22

People hate taxes and, by extention, the IRS. People genneraly have a very low opinion as to how effective tax money is spent in service of the people. People also hate taxes being spent on people they do not like and services that do not directly benefit themselves.

On ineffective spending, there is some truth to that. There are many examples of wasteful government spending of taxpayer dollars with almost no repercussions if you have money and power. Also, most people are willful naive and expect simple solutions to complex problems and are highly receptive to gaslighting that allows the people with the most money to pay almost no taxes.

TLDR: Shitty politicians waste taxpayer dollars with no accountability and most people are selfish, ignorant, simple minded, and easy to manipulate if you appeal to their selfish nature.

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u/[deleted] Sep 05 '22 edited Oct 10 '22

[deleted]

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u/Bootyhole-dungeon Sep 05 '22

We know Trump's not on the list. He's not a tax "payer".

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u/412suspect Sep 04 '22

Pretty standard really

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u/CARVERitUP Sep 05 '22

Glad we gave them 80 billion more dollars to be a fuckup agency in the government!

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u/nxhrnsjdns Sep 04 '22

Remember when the IRS got a shit ton of funding and acted like they were going to go after the 1% and instead just went even harder at regular people

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u/Bmor00bam Sep 05 '22

Is Donald John Trump and Jared Kushner included? They should be.

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u/Appropriate_Cattle44 Sep 05 '22

And hired 87,000 regressive “agents” trading n arming them to go door to door (of registered gun owners) in attempts to disarm as many if not all Of us who actually value real freedom not this pseudo freedom , autonomy ,creativity & meritocracy.

Not this entitled infantile welfare paracidic leeches demanding more free givenmes, 2+2=5 Clownworld where fee fees are facts down is up there’s 12000+ genders not two “you istaphobic nazi sexist bigot blah blah blah”

Enjoy the consequences for denying n shaming reality & THE truth itself. There is no “equality” in nature, as all other living organism we are bound by the cycle of life, instead of coming to grips our mortality modernity has deluded the herd to having a god complex, (reference the spreading cancer of Narcissism) NPCs will cry reading this

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u/Gimvargthemighty Sep 05 '22

That's an awfully convoluted way to say you're a bat-shit crazy, paranoid wackadoodle, my dude.

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u/DRKMSTR Sep 05 '22

Abolish the IRS?

I mean seriously, their job could be completed by a trained animal if we simplified the tax code.

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u/[deleted] Sep 04 '22 edited Sep 04 '22

I love how these companies say "hey we fucked up and lost your data, go change your passwords, its your fault".

At least they hired 87,000 armed agents to help out.

Edit: Yea downvote, bitches, its true.

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u/[deleted] Sep 04 '22 edited Sep 04 '22

[deleted]

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u/BlueXCrimson Sep 05 '22

Like twelve private corporations and banks have lost my information along with millions of others at a time. Whatever, man.

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u/reddit_reaper Sep 05 '22

Shit better than the credit bureaus lol

1

u/skywalker218 Sep 05 '22

“But let’s employ 89k more to make sure we got it right”

1

u/bradwest96 Sep 05 '22

Great, another reason to hate the IRS.

1

u/bradwest96 Sep 05 '22

Great, another reason to hate the IRS.

1

u/Lemme_Hear_Stories Sep 05 '22

“Mistaken”, can I mistakenly no pay my taxes?

1

u/Ghostdog2041 Sep 05 '22

I’ll tell you what I like less than this that the IRS has done. This year, the IRS has added 87,000 agents and 750,000 rounds of ammunition. Why? What are they, the tax office, gearing up for?

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u/CeeKay125 Sep 05 '22

“Mistakenly.” Ah yes, because nothing will be done to punish them and cause them to fix their systems so this will happen again in the future.

-1

u/Simply_game Sep 05 '22

Is one of them trump?

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u/[deleted] Sep 05 '22

I hope your one of them.

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u/Simply_game Sep 05 '22

Cry more about dear führer.

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u/[deleted] Sep 04 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Cool_Energy_3085 Sep 04 '22

This isn’t r/conspiracy my friend

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u/BidnessBoy Sep 04 '22

What part of that statement is a conspiracy theory? The IRS is hiring around 87,000 new workers/agents per Politico.

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u/Cool_Energy_3085 Sep 04 '22

I’m assuming the comment was referencing the right wing conspiracy of the new employees being hired to “hunt” people who are using dodgy write offs or whatever it is.

The only people I hear mention the 87000 new employees are the conspiracy mfs

1

u/BidnessBoy Sep 04 '22

You’re reading into something that isn’t even included in the comment of the dude who you’re trying to dunk on. Qanon morons and Blueanon morons are equally foolish in their never ending mental gymnastics to make “the other side” look bad.

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u/Cool_Energy_3085 Sep 04 '22

And you, are reading way too far into a Reddit comment. Nobody is trying to “dunk on” anyone else.

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